October 6, 2014

Learning from King David

spiritual warfare

This week we covered 2nd Samuel 11-13, 15, and 18, in which David fell to temptation and sinned against God. He took Bathsheba, his best friend’s wife, and lay with her while Uriah was fighting the war. When he could not conceal his adultery, he sent Uriah to be killed in the heat of the battle.

We saw that God, while granting forgiveness, punished David for his sin. In 2nd Samuel 12:11-12, we read the following prophecy from Nathan:

“11 Thus says the Lord: ‘Behold, I will raise up adversity against you from your own house; and I will take your wives before your eyes and give them to your neighbor, and he shall lie with your wives in the sight of this sun. 12 For you did it secretly, but I will do this thing before all Israel, before the sun.’”(NKJVS)

Both of these prophecies continued to be fulfilled in chapters 13 through 22. We saw David’s son, Amnon, filled with lust and raped his half-sister, Tamar. Absalom, after avenging his sister by killing Amnon, conspired against David by swaying the people after him, and announcing his reign in Hebron. Later, he even laid down with David’s concubines on the roof top of David’s palace in the sight of all Israel.

It’s extremely important to note that while God is forgiving, he will punish us for our sin. We saw this exemplified in David’s life. If we repent – truthfully and cease – we are forgiven but punishment still remains.

Punishment, however, should not be confused with condemnation. In Romans 8:1, we read, “There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit.” (NKJVS). But, what does it mean to walk according to the Spirit?

In Romans 8:13, we’re instructed that living according to the desires of the flesh will lead to death – “but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live.” (NKJV)

Condemnation, therefore, only rests on those who continue to live in sin, serving the body. This is further stated in Galatians 3:10: “For as many as are of the works of the law are under the curse; for it is written, ‘Cursed is everyone who does not continue in all things which are written in the book of the law, to do them.'” (NKJV). The law then, primarily the Ten Commandments, provides the knowledge of sin.

Doubtless some will argue that no one can live free from sin. If that’s the case, what makes one a saint? What does the word blameless mean in God’s Word? Were not Zechariah and Elizabeth said to be blameless before having John the Baptist? In Luke 1:6 we read, “And they were both righteous before God, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blameless” (NKJV). Had they sinned? Yes, I believe they had sinned – past tense – at some point in their lives. We know that all have sinned and a fallen short except Jesus. They did not, however, continue to live in sin or they would not have been blameless.

My hope for you, my brothers and sisters, is that you depart from sin and fear our Lord, Jesus Christ. As things continue to get worse for Christians in America and abroad, our obedience to God is now more important than ever.

May God bless and strengthen you in his word.

To read along with us, please visit http://fudm.proboards.com/board/2/weekly-study

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